Volume II~ The Writings of Fiona Macloed

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

By Mrs. William Sharp

The publication of Pharais (1894) and The Mountain Lovers (1895) by William Sharp, under the pseudonym of "Fiona Macleod," was followed by that of two volumes of Tales: The Sin-Eater and Other Tales in 1895, and The Washer of the Ford and Other Legendary Moralities in 1896, published by P. Geddes and Colleagues, to which firm William Sharp was literary adviser. In 1897 the contents of the two books were rearranged and published in a three-volume paper-covered edition entitled Barbaric Tales, Dramatic Tales, Spiritual Romances, and to each volume a new tale was added. In 1900 the five volumes were reissued by Mr. David Nutt.

In America The Washer of the Ford and The Sin-Eater were brought out by Messrs. Stone and Kimball (Chicago) in 1895 and 1896; and in 1906 were reissued by Messrs. Duffield & Co.

For the purposes of the present edition various alterations have been made in the arrangement of the two original volumes in as much as the major portion of their contents now form one volume. From The Sin-Eater the tales concerning the Achana Brothers are grouped together, with others of the same series under the sub-title of "Under the Dark Star," in The Dominion of Dreams (Vol. III), whereto "The Birdeen" has been transferred, and also "The Daughter of the Sun" in an altered form and entitled "A Memory." "Tragic Landscapes" now forms part of Volume VI.

The alterations in the contents of The Washer of the Ford are as follows: "Ula and Urla " is now included in The Sin-Eater section of this volume, because that tale is the sequel to "The Silk o' the Kine" and was written subsequently to the publication of The Sin-Eater. Two tales from "The Shadow-Seers" will be found in Vol. III, and two in Vol. IV. "The Woman with the Net" and "The Sad Queen" have been added to The The Washer of the Ford section from Dominion of Dreams Barbaric, and "Ahz the Pale" from Tales. "Dahut the Red," written in 1905, is herein reprinted from The Pall-Mall Magazine, where it appeared posthumously in 1906.

The slight revision of the text, and the substitution of the English titles of "St. Bride of the Isles" for "Muime Chriosd," and "Cathal of the Woods" for "The Anuir Choille," are in accordance with instructions left by the author.


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